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6 Habits That Increase The Risk Of Diabetes

Be aware and try to avoid these 6 habits that increase the risk of diabetes.

Let’s face it; it can be hard to maintain a healthy lifestyle when you’re surrounded by temptation. And there’s something to satisfy every taste: sweets, salty snacks, fast food, etc. Plus, they are everywhere. You see them at the supermarket, at the pastry shop near your office, in the hands of the person sitting next to you on the bus, and so on. Of course, nobody is forbidding you from indulging every once in a while. However, please don’t fall into the trap of making a habit out of it. And it’s not just because this can cause obesity, but it can also cause diabetes and many other health issues. So, it’s time to renew your vow to stay healthy and try to avoid these 6 habits that increase the risk of diabetes.

No. 1 Skipping Breakfast

We’ve all heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Unfortunately, when you’re in a rush to prepare your kids’ lunch boxes, get them to school and get yourself to work in the mornings, you usually end up skipping breakfast. But no matter how hard it is, you should make time for this

When you skip breakfast, you are much more tempted to eat fatty foods or overeat at lunch. On the one hand, this can cause weight gain. On the other hand, it causes an imbalance in your blood sugar and insulin levels. This, in turn, can result in diabetes.

Recent studies have shown that eating a healthy breakfast can reduce the risk of diabetes by 30%. So, don’t underestimate its importance. If you have no other option, at least make a healthy smoothie and drink it at the office. However, it is highly recommended to take the time and eat right. Consider eggs, fruit, and whole-grain for a rich breakfast.

A healthy breakfast consisting of whole-grain and fresh fruit.
Skipping breakfast is one of the top 6 habits that increase the risk of diabetes.

No. 2 Making Unhealthy Food Choices

We all know the theory that an unhealthy diet causes a lot of health issues. But unfortunately, many people still ignore this warning. You should know that research shows that eating highly processed foods can increase the risk of diabetes by up to 15%. And the same goes for refined carbs. All of these products are easily absorbed by your body, so you feel hungry sooner. Thus, you end up often snacking, which causes weight gain. This, in turn, can lead to insulin resistance and an increase in your blood sugar levels.

Therefore, having a healthy diet is essential in preventing diabetes and other health issues. So, focus on non-starchy vegetables (spinach, tomatoes, broccoli), whole grains (oats and brown rice), and fruit (cranberries, blueberries, strawberries). Apart from including these ingredients in your main courses, you should also include them in your snacks. Some great healthy snack ideas are out there, such as homemade protein bars or chia seed pudding.

A tomato and spinach salad.
To prevent diabetes, opt for a healthy diet that includes non-starchy vegetables such as spinach and tomatoes.

No. 3 Drinking Too Many Sugary Drinks

Studies have shown that sugary drinks are one of the leading causes of obesity in America. Moreover, they can increase the chance of diabetes by 26%. And the reason for this is that they contain empty calories that have absolutely no nutritious value. So, when you are thirsty, you should stay clear of them. Instead, opt for water. And if you still long for juice, go for fresh fruit juice or unsweetened ice tea.

A person holding a glass of water.
Sugary drinks can cause obesity and diabetes, so drink water instead.

No. 4 Going To Bed Late

The side effects are just as harmful whether you’re losing your nights partying or working. And don’t be fooled into thinking that those 8 hours of sleep during the day compensate for the night. How long you sleep is just as important as when you go to bed. Research shows that this bad habit causes an imbalance in your blood sugar levels and low insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, poor sleep also disrupts your metabolism and affects your body’s production and use of insulin. A good piece of advice is to stay away from screens for at least one hour before going to bed and read a book instead.

No. 5 Emotional Eating

Emotional eating is a significant concern. The main problem is that you tend to overeat when you’re feeling depressed. And it’s not just that, but you also tend to crave unhealthy food. All of this leads to weight gain and disrupts your blood sugar levels. Of course, everyone goes through rough times; you can’t avoid that. However, you should rely on your family and friends to get you through those rough patches to prevent emotional eating.

However, emotional eating is not only liked to depression but also stress. And the problem goes even further than that. When you’re stressed, your body releases more cortisol, which increases glucose production, leading to high blood sugar levels. 

So, to decrease the risk of diabetes, the advisors at homegrownmoving.com recommend avoiding stressful activities as much as possible. One option here would be to delegate. For example, to avoid a stressful move, hire some professionals to help you. Or ask your colleagues at work to help you with the workload.

No. 6 Being Inactive

One of the top 6 habits that increase the risk of diabetes is being inactive. Sitting all day at the office, then in your car, and finally in front of the TV at home is extremely unhealthy. Apart from causing weight gain and diabetes, it can even cause heart disorders and mental health issues. So, you shouldn’t take this lightly. Try to make time for a bit of exercise. For example, the American Diabetes Association advises everyone to walk or exercise for at least half an hour every day. You can do this even if you’re stuck at the office. Take short breaks to move around and do a bit of stretching.

A Piece Of Advice

Avoiding these bad habits will decrease the risk of diabetes but won’t eliminate it. So, besides having a healthy lifestyle, you should also get tested regularly. Furthermore, look out for the early signs of diabetes. These include fatigue, increased hunger, extreme thirst, blurred vision, and mood swings. So, make sure you contact your doctor if you have any concerns.

Conclusion

An unhealthy lifestyle can cause many health issues. And two of the most common issues Americans currently face are weight gain and diabetes. This is not at all surprising when you bump into delicious unhealthy treats at every corner. However, you should do your best to avoid them as much as possible. Plus, there are other contributing factors as

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Why It Is Important to Talk About Your Diabetes

A woman talking to a man about her diabetes while in the kitchen.

Guest post by Jassica Mendez

Controlling your diabetes takes up a lot of time, and it’s likely that discussing it is the last thing on your mind. You may prefer to manage your diabetes on your own terms, without the assistance of others. On the other hand, if you’ve recently been diagnosed, you might need some time to process everything that comes with this chronic disease. Everyone’s circumstance is unique, and talking about it can be difficult, especially when it concerns your own health. It is also possible that you still don’t understand your own feelings about it. It is, however, necessary for a variety of reasons. If you need motivation or want to find a purpose as to why you should talk about your diabetes, we understand, and we are here to help.

It will help other people understand what you’re going through

Opening up about what they are going through, no matter how minor or major, can be difficult for some people. After all, some of us may have grown accustomed to handling challenging situations independently. Allowing others into our lives and sharing our daily challenges, on the other hand, can help them comprehend our frustrations, moods, and overall way of life. When it comes to discussing your diabetes, this is no exception. Diabetes, whether we like it or not, is an important aspect of our lives and should be discussed with people around us.

Although experts familiar with this challenging illness and the way it affects our lives understand what we’re going through, loved ones may require further assistance. Thus, personal trainers from DubaiPT advise you to teach your loved ones about diabetes, your symptoms, and how they might be able to assist you. Allow them to ask questions, address any worries, and express how much you appreciate their desire to learn more. However, keep in mind that, like you, they may need some time to process this information. 

A view of a person's hands holding a glucose meter and a thin blue ribbon.

It can even be a real eye-opener for you

Even if you don’t believe it at first, talking about your diabetes can help you better understand yourself. The way you speak about a subject like this may mirror your inner views, and expressing them might help you put things in perspective, especially if you’re talking about it with your child. The way you simplify it and explain it can be a real eye-opener to how you actually view the illness yourself.

 Simply saying the words aloud can aid in processing your thoughts. It can help you break free from a cycle of worrying, allowing you to feel less stressed. It may also help you identify and rectify a negative mindset you have about diabetes. Furthermore, by having someone listen and inquire about it, you will learn more about the topic itself since you may need to do some research to respond.

A woman sitting at a desk writing things down on a notepad near her laptop.
While talking about your diabetes can help you better understand yourself, be sure to keep note of what you learn.

It will help you find more support

By being open with people about your diabetes, you will be left with even more support. After all, how can someone help you when they don’t know you need help? They may help in various ways, such as helping you with some tasks, so you have less on your plate.

Alternatively, you may be fine on your own but need a simple hug to get through the day.

Open up to people around you, and you may be surprised by how many people can relate to or know someone that struggles with the same thing. Even while those not suffering from the same illness can support you, it may be more beneficial to speak with someone who has diabetes. Connecting with other individuals who have diabetes can help you make positive adjustments and work through daily obstacles like feeling nervous about your blood sugar levels or trying to figure out when to take your injections. You will know you’re not alone and that other people are dealing with the same issues by opening up.

Sharing your experience with diabetes with others may even inspire you to support yourself more. You could, for example, look into meal plans for diabetics that are catered to your very own dietary requirements. Since many healthy options are available, you are sure to find some that work for you. It would be best to be your very own support through any challenge life throws your way.

A group of 4 people standing near a cliff looking at the sunset.
Build your own support group to help you get through each day.

It will replace myths with knowledge

There is nothing worse than dealing with something and people around you being misinformed about it. The proper way to rectify this issue is to talk about your diabetes openly and replace myths with knowledge. Most people, especially those close to you, will be thrilled about learning more and debunking harmful myths.

You have the option of debunking these beliefs in a variety of ways. Most people may prefer to research the disease and share what they’ve learned. On the other hand, others may want to include their loved ones when researching. If all else fails, you may bring them to different diabetes education classes so you can both learn something new.

No matter what method you choose, you all will be left with a better understanding of diabetes. This will benefit you and anyone you can share this knowledge with.

It will help raise awareness

 The diabetes community marks Diabetes Awareness Month every November with events, fundraisers, and initiatives to educate the public and raise awareness about the disease. However, even if it isn’t November, you should try your best to help raise awareness. Of course, you may have different levels of awareness depending on where you are in your diabetes journey. This, however, shouldn’t stop you from talking about your diabetes and your personal experience with it.

Since diabetes affects roughly 463 million people worldwide, it is a topic that should be discussed often. You can educate individuals who may not be aware of the symptoms, risk factors, or treatment alternatives. And who knows, if you talk about your diabetes openly, you may even help someone prevent or delay prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. 

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How To Talk To Your Child About Diabetes

Glucose meter surrounded by sweets on a blue surface

Guest post by Jassica Mendez

If your child has been diagnosed with diabetes at such a tender age, we understand it can be frightening. Even though it can be hard to explain that they have a life-long condition, there are ways you can help them feel more confident and understand the issue better. Having this condition doesn’t mean kids can’t be kids. On the contrary, your kid’s confidence, good health, and understanding start with having an open and positive conversation. For instance, there are numerous sugar-free cookie recipes and delicious treats, so don’t think they’ll miss all the fun. The article below shares some things to keep in mind if you wish to talk to your child about diabetes and make their diagnosis feel manageable.

What to keep in mind if you want to talk to your child about diabetes

All changes we experience throughout our lives can be overwhelming and even shocking. Each change our family faces should be taken under great thought and honest conversation. Parenting a child diagnosed with diabetes isn’t easy, especially if you’re trying to manage other family obligations like preparing for a long-distance move or home renovations. That’s why it’s crucial to have a plan in place to guide you. This way, you’ll make sure you’re all ready for the moving day, and your child will know what to expect along the way, especially when it comes to their medication and nutrition.

Above all, you will have to find a way to explain they will need to follow a particular meal plan, monitor their glucose levels, and take insulin shots. Their condition is here to stay, so you will all need to make changes to your lives be empathetic and patient until it becomes a routine. This is why you need to learn about their condition so you’ll be able to explain it to them. Here’s some advice to help you have an effective conversation.

Remain honest

First and foremost, it’s crucial to always tell the truth to your child. Then, if they start asking questions, be sure you give them answers, even the unpleasant ones. Getting all of your questions answered helps everyone feel more in control and learn more about the condition itself.

Another common situation is that kids feel they’ve done something wrong and got this diagnosis. For that reason, we as parents must make it clear this isn’t the case.

Finally, you need to make sure they know their diabetes isn’t going away and that you will all need to learn how to live your best lives with keeping it manageable. At this point, your child might feel upset and sad. This is where it’s important to welcome these emotions and tell them it’s okay they think this way. Encourage them to talk about it openly and share any doubts or frustrations they might have.

Stay positive

How we handle certain situations reflects on our kids, especially if they’re young. This is why we need to make sure we sent the right message:

Their diabetes is here to stay. You will need to learn the ways to manage it. Luckily, together you can get it under control.

When you discuss your child’s condition, it’s vital to be supportive and make these open conversations a part of your everyday life. Regular talk is what normalizes the situation. You will help your kid understand that it’s possible to keep their condition under control with proper management, mindful care, and live a normal life.

A positive father laughing with his daughter, which is crucial if you want to talk to your child about diabetes
It’s essential to remain positive when you want to talk to your child about diabetes.

Here are some ways you can encourage your young child with diabetes.

  • Praise them each time they pick out a healthy snack.
  • Praise them when they finish their dinner. 
  • Compliment them each time they take on some self-care responsibilities.

Our kids look to us for guidance, so how we deal with their condition affects how they feel and act. For example, if we overreact and get angry about their high sugar levels, our children can be less honest about their sugar readings in the future.

Be informed

Another vital thing is to stay on top of the latest diabetes care information and pass it on to your child. You can use this opportunity to make this a fun learning experience for both you and your child and not feel pressured to become an expert in the field right away.

Be excited to find out some types of sweets will still be on the menu, that they still can play, exercise, and have fun like their friends, but that insulin is a necessity. 

A glucose meter, a blue ribbon, and dice saying diabetes.
Making diabetes less scary and a fun learning process can help minimize the fear your child might feel.

Be supportive

Finally, being diagnosed with diabetes can be confusing and stressful. This is why it’s essential to educate the whole family about the matter and involve everyone in your child’s journey

If you have other children who don’t have this diagnosis, it would be good to discuss why keeping a healthy lifestyle is essential to everyone, not just those with diabetes. Try to include each family member in meal and activity plans so your kid with a diagnosis doesn’t feel left out or special in a negative sense.

Having involved family members is a crucial part of managing diabetes throughout childhood.

Age-appropriate conversations about diabetes

Finally, here are some tips on how to talk to your child about diabetes according to their age.

  1. Infants and toddlers don’t understand why they need to have their fingers poked. Making this a daily routine will help, like diaper changes or naps. In addition, it would help perform diabetes care gently and quickly and be soothing and reassuring afterward.
  2. Preschool kids will also rely on their parents for diabetes care. However, you can explain the care-related obligations in simple terms, so they know what’s happening. It could also help to give them some sense of control by, for example, asking them which finger they want to use for the glucose test. 
  3. Kids in school should learn how to take on some of their diabetes care but with parental guidance. It’s vital to remain supportive and not push your child, but allow them to take on new responsibilities gradually. It’s also this age when they might start feeling sensitive about being different from their peers. It would help if you understood these temporary setbacks and avoided being overprotective. You could also emphasize that once they take responsibility for their diabetes care, it will be easier to attend different parties and have sleepovers.
  4. Teenagers are the ones that could make poor decisions about their diabetes care due to peer pressure. This is when you should talk about drugs, sexuality, alcohol, and how this can affect their condition. Just keep in mind there’s a fine line between lecturing and offering support. This is why it would help if you approached your child in a caring manner
A mother and daughter taking a walk and talking about diabetes
When wanting to discuss diabetes with your kid, it’s essential to keep their age in mind.

Final thoughts on how to talk to your child about diabetes

Finally, when you are preparing to talk to your child about diabetes, it could help if you found a support group to help you connect with other parents and kids in the same condition. Talking to your kids about their condition can be difficult at any age. However, keeping the communication honest and open is the key. The more you speak to them about it, the more prepared they’ll be for taking care of their diabetes when you’re apart. 

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Snack Ideas for Kids with Diabetes

snack ideas for kids with diabetes

Controlling diabetes is impossible without a good meal plan. Since the main issue of this illness is the inability to transfer fuel into energy, you need to find ways to provide enough fuel to keep your organism going and keep sugar levels as normal as possible. In such cases, portion control is crucial for optimum functioning and preventing hyperglycemia. Ideally, kids with diabetes should have three meals a day, with 2-3 snacks in between. Keeping the meals moderate and adding small snacks every couple of hours will help you get it under control. Having 10 -15 grams of carbohydrates, healthy fats, and proteins can help you achieve that goal. Luckily, there are many snack ideas for kids with diabetes that will make their strict dietary regimen fun and tasty!

The healthiest snacks for diabetes are the simplest ones

The main purpose of any snack is to be able to consume it on the go. In addition, it needs to provide a necessary kick start to your system between main meals and get sugar levels under control. You don’t need to spend hours preparing them in the kitchen or worry about serving them hot and cold. However, you need to make sure the snacks have quality ingredients with a low glycemic index and some protein value. Naturally, they need to be low in sugar and, if possible, have some healthy fats. The best type of snack is a combination of:

  •  Vegetables: lettuce, spinach, eggplant, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, snow peas, etc.
  • Fruits: cherry, plum, peach, pear, kiwi, orange, grapefruit, apples, and most berries.
  • Lean meats: lamb, veal, pork, poultry without the skin, fish, or most processed meats with less than a gram of fat per ounce.
  • Nuts: peanuts, walnuts, pistachios, almonds, cashews.
  • Yogurts and cheeses: Greek yogurt, Icelandic yogurt, non-salty cheese in mindful portions.
diverse snacks for people with diabetes
People with diabetes can consume most of the food as long as they’re being rational with portioning.

How to make healthy snacks fun?

Remember when you were a kid, and your parents made you eat healthy vegetables? It wasn’t much fun, was it? Your children probably share the same opinion. Therefore, you’ll need to get creative in motivating them to eat the right kinds of snacks. Some of the things you can do are:

  1. Dip the fruit bits in dark chocolate – every kid loves chocolate, even if it has low sugar content.
  2. Be creative with the vegetable mix – arranging them in a fun way or making the food colorful might be appealing to your kid.
  3. Make perfect bites – combine different healthy snacks in tiny arrangements.
  4. Ask your kids about their favorite ingredients – mix them up with less preferred eats to achieve a good balance and make it easy on your kid.

Another great way to interest your kid in snacks is to prepare them together! Every child loves projects, and their mind is bursting with creativity and smart ideas. Thus, give your little one a chance to prepare the food independently. All you need to do is observe or equally participate, providing occasional guidance when mixing ingredients. This is an excellent way of helping kids engage with food. In addition, learning how to make simple snacks and meals will teach them independence early.

a mother and children trying healthy snacks for kids with diabetes
There is nothing more important for your child than spending quality moments with the family.

Avoid forcing them to eat food they dislike

Stress is the main trigger for diabetes in kids. Being exposed to traumatic events or changes in the environment, like relocation to another home, can significantly impact your child’s health, triggering or causing diabetes. Thus, you need to help them adapt after the move and give them time to process all the changes. It might be challenging to inspire your child to eat fully healthy food at first, but today there are many tasty diabetes-friendly products that your kids will love.

Some of the favorite snack ideas for kids with diabetes

Yogurt with berries and nuts

One of the quickest and most delicious mixes there is. Simply mix an Icelandic or Greek yogurt with a handful of blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, or any type of berries your kid prefers. Add some chopped nuts, stir it up, and you’ll have the perfect healthy snack that you can also use instead of breakfast or a dessert.

The combination of active probiotic cultures from yogurt and proteins from berries and nuts will be great for your kid’s digestion. Moreover, it will provide enough energy to keep the right glucose levels in the system.

Chia seed pudding

Chia seeds do wonders for the metabolism because they are rich in omega 3 fatty acids, magnesium, and fibers. If used often, they can also serve as a powerful antioxidant. That being said, introducing chia seeds into your kid’s diet will bring many benefits.

Mix half a cup of chia seeds, 1/3 of a cup of cocoa powder, and a pinch of sea salt. Afterward, add one and a half cups of almond milk and stir it well until all the ingredients are blended. Leave it in the fridge for a few hours, or preferably overnight.

Homemade protein bars

Making your energy-rich sweets is very easy! And all you need is some chopped peanuts, half a cup of coconut flour, 1/4 of a low-carb vanilla protein powder, a teaspoon of Stevia, a cup of natural peanut butter, and 1/4 cup of sugar-free syrup. First, merge peanut butter with syrup and heat it for 2 minutes in the microwave, mixing until it evenly blends. After, add the dry ingredients – coconut flour, Stevia, and protein.

If the dough becomes too thick, add more syrup. However, if the mix is too wet, fix it with more coconut flour. When you achieve an optimum blend, press the batter onto the pan. Lastly, sprinkle it with chopped peanuts, and refrigerate for a couple of hours before serving. 

a gluten-free cookie and milk
No child will resist a good cookie! With diabetes-friendly sweets, you just need to be more creative with the ingredients.

Naturally, if you prefer trying out some old-school sugar-free cookie recipes instead, you certainly won’t disappoint your kid. 

Conclusion

These snack ideas for kids with diabetes can help you control the illness and make it easier for your kids. However, even though the dietary regime is consistent for diabetes, not everyone will have the same benefits. To be safe, consider your dietitian’s recommendation and approval of certain ingredients because there is more than one factor to consider when finding out what works best.

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Moving Day with Diabetes

A set of hands measuring their blood sugar levels.
Photo by PhotoMIX Company from Pexels

Guest post by Jassica Mendez

Dealing with a chronic illness such as diabetes can be strenuous. On top of that, significant life changes inevitably cause some degree of stress. So, without careful consideration and planning, your moving day with diabetes could cause your symptoms to flare up. Luckily, there are ways to simplify your life and the big moving day. So, if you want to ensure a smooth move, stay tuned for our tips on moving when chronically ill.

Essential tips for your moving day with diabetes

Changing houses puts a massive strain on people and can intervene with their diabetes management. This especially holds today, as many people have to move due to the pandemic and shutdowns.

Luckily, people can relocate successfully with diabetes. Above all, the change can be a pleasant surprise too. So, if you are moving to your larger dream home, there are things you’ll need to take care of to ensure a smooth moving day.

For instance, you should have an emergency medical kit by you at all times carefully plan when and what you will eat on a moving day. People who have diabetes must create a meal plan for events like this. Even though food doesn’t sound like something that should be on top of someone’s list on a moving day, some medication requires taking it before or after a meal.

Therefore, to avoid feeling unwell during a day that is bound to be tiresome, here are the tips to follow when moving with diabetes.

Make a plan ahead and stick to it

Planning is the number one piece of advice for everyone moving homes, especially those living with chronic illnesses. For example, if your diabetes makes you feel unwell after an active and tiresome day, you should ensure you have enough time for all the await tasks. With that said, you should ensure you undertake the tasks reasonably and in small chunks of time instead of cramming everything in a single weekend.

The same goes for the actual moving day: many chronic illnesses organize their lives around their medical problem. Therefore, you should listen to your body, be aware of your limits, and don’t let other people’s methods and expectations get in the way.

Make all the necessary arrangements

The physical and mental effort required to move home shouldn’t be underestimated. In terms of the physical effort, you should be aware of the heavy lifting involved. So, if you are dealing with an illness that causes discomfort, you should consider hiring a full-service moving company that can do these things instead of you.

This way, you will minimize the labor you need to do. Also, you will ensure having peace of mind and simplify your move.

Moving supplies are crucial

If you’ve been dealing with diabetes for some years now, you must have a lot of diabetes-related items accumulated. So, make sure you pack a separate box with your supplementary medicine and diabetic equipment.

Moving supplies (a box. duct tape, and scissors) on a wooden table.
A box with a different colored duct tape designated for your illness-related supplies will make the moving day with diabetes easier.

Alt tag: Moving supplies (a box. duct tape, and scissors) on a wooden table.

Get organized and line up your care

The general rush of moving can easily cause you to forget to get your refills and check expiration dates. So, when the moving time comes, it’s vital to write things down to control your diabetes better. Keeping your to-do lists, schedules, and those kinds of things in a binder you always keep near will be lifesaving.

An organized container full of medicine for the moving day with diabetes.
All major changes can lead to forgetting the usual stuff, such as refilling your medicine.

Additionally, having a relocation-related binder with all the dates, tasks, and bills will help keep up with everything.

Another thing you shouldn’t forget is to change your healthcare provider once you move. Or even make the arrangements beforehand. For example, if you are moving to another state, you might need another insurance plan, pharmacy, and support services. So make sure you include what you will need before your move to make it easier for yourself once you are there.

Don’t hesitate to ask friends and family for help

Preparing for your moving day with diabetes is the perfect time to ask your family and friends for help. They can help you clean the place, clear out your closet, or pack the boxes. In addition, you can all use this time to say your goodbyes if you are moving somewhere further away.

Unfortunately, not everyone has friends or family to turn to. So it’s good to be aware that professionals can assist you with physical tasks. Also, your local council or community may be able to provide some support.

Have an emergency kit

Doctors recommend always keeping your meds nearby, as well as some emergency kit. Even though you might not take packing and moving boxes as an exercise, it’s simply not a thing your body is used to doing. Therefore, those activities can easily lead to your blood sugar plummeting.

A hand holding a can of diet coke in front of a green door.
It never hurts having a diet coke on hand when moving houses.

Simplify elsewhere to manage stress

Apart from all the logistics, the most challenging part when managing a relocation is stress. So, since you have some unavoidable projects on your plate, you can try and simplify the rest of your life. Logically, it all starts with doing things beforehand and being organized.

By staying organized and arranging everything in advance, you can pay attention to some of the following:

  • pare down your social engagements;
  • avoid unnecessary school involvements;
  • put your finances on prepay;
  • get enough sleep;
  • give yourself some time to relax and say goodbye to your previous home;
  • keep up with your usual routine as much as possible. 

Final words

No doubt, dealing with a chronic illness can make your day-to-day tasks a bit more challenging. Hopefully, our tips for your moving day with diabetes will lead to fewer flares and help you stay on top of your health game. So, make sure you refer to our article to focus your energies in the right places.

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Common Diabetes Myths You Should Stop Believing

Common diabetes myth

Guest post by Jassica Mendez

Diabetes is, unfortunately, a pretty common disease. As a result, there is a lot of available information about it. However, there are also many myths circling diabetes. That’s why distinguishing myths from facts is crucial for both diabetes patients and those around them. People with diabetes need to identify the facts in order to properly manage the condition. On the other hand, the people around them should be aware of these myths to provide adequate assistance if ever needed. Since so much information about diabetes is available, sometimes it’s hard to differentiate fact from fiction. So, let’s talk about the most common diabetes myths you should stop believing.

#1 Diabetes Is Contagious

This is probably the most common diabetes myth out there. However, this is far from the truth. Diabetes is a non-contagious disease! It can’t be transmitted through blood, touching, or sneezing. So, if you know someone who has diabetes, they can’t infect you. The only way diabetes can be transmitted is through genetics. For example, parents can pass this condition to their children. However, if your parents have diabetes, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have it too.

#2 People With Diabetes Can’t Eat Any Sweets

Another one of the common diabetes myths circling is that people who have diabetes can’t eat any sweets. While sweets in large quantities can be harmful, it’s not true that those with diabetes can’t eat them at all. After all, too many sweets isn’t good for anyone. For example, it can be hard for those with type 2 diabetes to control blood sugar levels and even their weight. However, that doesn’t mean they have to fully stay off sweets. With a balanced intake, everything can be properly controlled. So, make sure to always have a healthier alternative to avoid going overboard.

Colorful candy
Photo by Polina Tankilevitch from Pexels


No, eating too much sugar is not the reason someone has diabetes, and yes – people with diabetes can eat sweets.

#3 People With Diabetes Need A Special Diet

Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have to cut out foods from your diet. In fact, people with diabetes should have the same type of diet as everyone else – a healthy and balanced one. Making healthy choices like this will help improve your metabolism and, thus, keep your condition under control. That’s why you need to choose metabolism-boosting foods like fruit and vegetables but also fish, eggs, low-fat dairy, beans, pulses, and lean meat. Eating these foods will ensure you get enough calcium and iron throughout the diet.

Additionally, avoid having sugar, fat, and salt-rich foods every day. Instead, make healthier substitutions. Avoid sugary drinks since the sugar they contain is absorbed more quickly by the body. Furthermore, when cooking, use unsaturated fats instead of saturated ones. As you can see, not being able to eat regular foods is just another one of the common diabetes myths.

#4 Diabetes Is Caused By Eating Too Much Sugar

There are two types of diabetes – 1 and 2, and neither one of them is caused by eating too much sugar. Type 1 diabetes results from destroyed cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Therefore, it can’t be a result of a poor diet or lifestyle choices.

Furthermore, even though type 2 diabetes is common among obese people, you can’t say that it’s caused by eating too much sugar. Yes, a diet rich in sugar is often a high-calorie diet, which can lead to obesity. However, obesity isn’t the only factor that causes diabetes, although it can increase its chances.

#5 Type 2 Diabetes Is The ‘Mild One’

This is one of the most commonly circulated diabetes misconceptions, yet it is obviously false. The fact is that there is no such thing as a mild form of diabetes, even if it doesn’t require medication to control it. The truth is, if type 2 diabetes is not adequately managed, it can lead to significant (even life-threatening) consequences such as blindness and amputation, as well as a greater risk of heart attack and stroke. Although good diabetes management can lower the likelihood of complications, this does not negate the fact that diabetes is a serious condition.

Person measuring their blood sugar.
There is no such thing as mild diabetes.

#6 People With Diabetes Should Avoid Exercising 

This is one of the diabetes myths that several well-known athletes have debunked. People with diabetes can and should exercise in order to ensure a healthy lifestyle.

Many people also think that only overweight and obese people with diabetes can benefit from exercising. However, that’s false as well. Regardless of your fat mass, any physical activity is beneficial to a person with diabetes. Exercise, such as walking, aids insulin’s ability to fulfill its function more effectively. As a result, physical activity is crucial for optimizing blood sugar regulation.

Fortunately, there are many great exercises for people with diabetes, and with the help of a personal trainer, they can create an appropriate workout program that will help them lead a more healthy lifestyle and control their condition.

#7 People With Diabetes Can’t Drink Alcohol

It is still acceptable to consume alcohol if you have diabetes, but you should limit yourself to no more than 14 units per week. Just make sure you have a few alcohol-free days during the week if you do drink.

If you’re attempting to lose weight, keep in mind that alcohol can increase your calorie intake while boosting your hunger and decreasing your inhibitions, making it more challenging to stick to a healthy diet.

If you use certain diabetic treatments (insulin or sulfonylureas), you’re more likely to get a hypo if you consume alcohol. This impact can last up to 24 hours after you’ve had alcohol, so make sure you’re prepared and that those around you are aware of it.

#8 All Overweight People Get Diabetes

Although excess weight can increase the chances of getting diabetes, it’s false to assume that all overweight or obese people have it. This condition isn’t related to weight mass, at least not only to this. Actually, about 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are not overweight. And this is not a low percentage. Therefore, this is just another common diabetes myth that needs to be debunked.

Weight can affect blood sugar, but it's not the leading cause of diabetes.
Woman measuring her body mass.

#9 Certain Herbs Can Cure Diabetes

No, hibiscus leaves, cinnamon, turmeric, or any other herb cannot help you cure diabetes. In reality, there is no such thing as a spice or herb that can magically heal diabetes. Although certain herbs and foods can help people with type 2 diabetes improve their insulin sensitivity or resistance, they can’t eliminate the illness. Diabetes is not curable; it’s a life-long disease that you can keep under control with a healthy diet and/or medication. Therefore, this goes on the list of the most common diabetes myths you should stop believing!

Conclusion

Unfortunately, you probably heard about these common diabetes myths. And maybe you believed some of them are true. It’s time to change those beliefs and educate yourself about this condition. As you can see, people with diabetes can lead a normal healthy life with the help of a proper diet and/or medication. They don’t have to avoid eating certain foods and sweets; they just have to find balance. Fortunately, that’s not a hard thing to do. So, now that you got all the facts straight, it’s time to share them with others!

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Renewing My Vow To Be Healthy

woman wearing black sports bra and jogger shorts smiling

Austyn4mos

This year I am renewing my vow to be healthy.

After I had my second daughter, I slacked off on many of my healthy habits. I stopped working out, stopped checking my blood sugar numbers, and started eating more fried foods. I attributed most of the changes to the new baby. In realty it was just a lack of discipline.

I want to live to see my children finish high school, graduate from college, marry and one day have families of their own. In order to do so, I pledge to start back working out two days a week and recommit to limiting fried foods to once a month and sweets to once a week.

The Inflammation Cure

In addition to Type 2 Diabetes, I also have ulcerate colitis and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis which are both linked to inflammation. I recently read The Inflammation Cure by D.r William Meggs. In the book Dr. Meggs mentioned that one of the underlying causes of Type 2 Diabetes is inflammation. He also suggested that eating less meat and more fruits and vegetables will help keep inflammation down.

On January 2nd I took the pledge to incorporate  Meatless Mondays in hopes to reduce the inflammation associated with my chronic conditions and recommit to living a healthy lifestyle. This will be very challenging but I am willing to try it. I am renewing my vow to be healthy. What changes are you planning to make for your health this year?

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How To Control Diabetes

Diabetes is the third leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of blindness for adults. Although there is no cure for diabetes you can prevent the complications associated with diabetes by keeping your blood sugar levels under control. Diet and exercise are key to keeping your blood sugars at a normal rate and may also be used to decrease the amount and or frequency of medication needed to manage your diabetes. Here are my suggestions for Diet and Exercise.

 

Exercise
Try to exercise 30 minutes at least twice a week. You can break the 30 minutes up into 10 minute increments by taking the dog for a walk, dancing to a few songs or playing chase with your kids or grand kids. Be creative and have fun!

Diet
Incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your diet. I like to add spinach to eggs, top hotdogs with mixed greens and throw in blueberries with oatmeal, yogurt or cereal. When dining out order a salad for your appetizer. That way you know you had a serving of vegetables before your entree even comes out.

Don’t buy junk food when you go grocery shopping. If you don’t have junk food in your house then you will be less likely to eat junk food. In addition, I found that eliminating cow’s milk, soda, white bread and white rice have helped me to keep my blood sugar levels under control. I have replaced cow’s milk with almond milk but I encourage you to try alternatives like soy, coconut milk and rice milk.

Finally, eat more foods that help regulate blood sugar levels. Foods such as sweet potatoes, spinach, avocados and salmon are known for lowering or helping to maintain normal blood sugar levels.

Education

Aside from diet and exercise I encourage you to read anything you can get your hands on that mentions diabetes, nutrition or health.  You are responsible for taking control of your diabetes not your doctor and in order to take control you have to become educated. In addition to learning about how diet and exercise effect your blood sugar levels, I also recommend seeing a nutritionist or dietician. They can help you learn how to read food labels and create a meal plan based on your age, weight and nutritional goals.

Doctors will often prescribe medication without discussing the importance of diet and exercise in controlling blood sugar levels. Many will simply suggest you loose weight. For skinny diabetics like me we don’ t necessarily need to loose weight we just need to adopt healthier eating, and exercise habits.

 

When making healthy lifestyle changes, I suggest that you start with a few changes and stick to them and most importantly relax since stress can also raise your blood sugar.

Have you tried any of these tips? Do you have other suggestions for helping others take control of their diabetes? Let me know what works or doesn’t work for you and feel free to share any additional advice that you may have.

 

 

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What is Diabetes?

There are 34.2 million people living with diabetes in the United States.  Although diabetes impacts every 1 in 10 Americans, many people still don’t know what diabetes is. In fact, I know several people who have been diagnosed but can not explain what diabetes actually is. Even some of my family members still call it “The Sugar”.

WHAT IS DIABETES?

Diabetes or diabetes mellitus, as it is called in the medical field, is a chronic disease. That means it can be controlled but not cured.  Diabetes occurs when your body either does not produce any insulin, does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use the insulin produced well enough to keep your blood sugar levels at a normal rate.

If your body does not produce any insulin or does not produce enough insulin then you develop what is known as insulin deficiency. On the other hand, if your body produces insulin but does not use it properly then you develop insulin resistance. Both insulin deficiency and insulin resistance cause people with diabetes to have higher blood sugar levels than people without diabetes. Thus the nickname “The Sugar” which refers to blood sugar levels not table sugar, cakes, or pies as I once believed.

diabetes testing supplies

WHAT IS INSULIN?

Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate your body’s blood sugar levels. It is produced in your body’s pancreas. The pancreas is an organ located behind the stomach. The beta cells in the pancreas produce insulin. For diabetics the beta cells in the pancreas either do not work very well or do not work at all.

Contrary to popular belief, insulin treatment is not the worst case scenario for treating diabetes. Insulin injections are actually the most natural why to treat diabetes. However, most people, including myself, don’t like the idea of needles so we prefer to use medication instead of insulin to help control diabetes.

TYPES OF DIABETES

There are three types of diabetes:

Type 1

  • No insulin production
  • Typically diagnosed in young adults and children

Type 2

  • The body does not produce enough insulin or does not use the insulin well enough to regulate blood sugar levels
  • Most often diagnosed in adults
  • Accounts for an estimated 80% of all diabetics

preganant mother with diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

  • Occurs during pregnancy
  • Women who are diagnosed with gestational diabetes have a higher risk of developing Type 2 after pregnancy

PREDIABETES

Prediabetes occurs prior to the full onset type 2 diabetes. During this period a person’s blood sugars are high but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Like many people, I failed to recognize the warnings when I was prediabetic. Although, my mother was diagnosed with type 2 in her late forties, I thought that I was too young (twenty something) and too thin to be concerned with diabetes.  I didn’t realize that if you have a family history of diabetes you are more likely to be have prediabetes and be diagnosed with diabetes.

I now recall being told on two separate occasions that my blood sugars were higher than normal. Each time I would try to rationalize why my sugars were high by making excuses such as having pancakes or muffins that morning.

The truth is I probably could have either prolonged the development of type 2 or prevented it all together had I not ignored the warning signs. Studies show that regular physical activity combined with a balanced diet can help reduce the risk of developing  diabetes by 40-70%.

Diabetes no longer has to be  a death sentence. I look forward to living a long and healthy life free of complications. And in order to do so, I have to stay informed, active, and engaged with my doctor. If you have recently been diagnosed I hope that this information will help inspire you to take control of your diabetes.